After clicking and clacking its way into the gaming-keyboard category with its Alloy FPS gaming keyboard and its noisy Cherry MX Blue switches last year, HyperX is now expanding the options for folks who want something a bit quieter.

The Cherry MX Red switch in action.

Above: The Cherry MX Red switch in action.

Image Credit: Cherry

HyperX, which is memory company Kingston’s gaming brand, is now offering the Alloy with the Cherry MX Red or Brown switches in addition to Blue. The keyboard still features its low-profile, minimal-bezel design specifically oriented for Counter-Strike: Global Offensive players, but now fans of the Cherry switches can get the exact key-pressing action that they are looking for. Primarily, the difference between Brown, Blue, and Red is the decibel level of the click. Blue is the loudest, Brown is quieter, and Red is the quietest, and many people prefer the Red because this prevents their typing or playing from disrupting the people around them. The Alloy FPS is available in all three configurations now for $100.

Beyond the various noise levels of the switches, the ways in which they actuate vary slightly. The Red uses a linear-style switch that offers consistent, rapid resistance. The Brown, however, features a tactile switch that provides more noticeable feedback when you click. The Blue is an extreme version of the Brown that emphasizes that feedback.

“HyperX is pleased to expand our Alloy FPS keyboard product line to now include Cherry MX Red or Brown switches, along with the blue switches we introduced in 2016,” HyperX senior business manager Marcus Hermann said in a statement. “Gamers who play FPS classics like CS:GO or Overwatch can now choose from a variety of Alloy FPS gaming keyboards including a linear switch, a tactile switch, or something in between.”

I previously tested the HyperX Alloy FPS with the Blue switches, and I really found a lot to like about this keyboard. Now, I’m testing out the Red switches, and it’s still the same solid overall piece of equipment just with more options to fit the preferences of a wider variety of people. Here’s my review of the Blue version:

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